With the recent gluten-free craze, are we forgetting about the health benefits of rye?
Rye supplies high levels of iron, calcium, potassium and zinc as well as vitamin E and a variety of B vitamins.  Rye is also a good source of protein and soluble fiber. Studies have found rye to improve cardiovascular health, help with cancer prevention, and management of diabetes. It also has been found to promote weight control and improve digestive health. Rye flour has a much lower gluten content than wheat. To include more rye in your diet, making some rye sourdough starter and baking some rye bread is a good start.

Before you get scared- this is not hard. I’ve been baking rye bread a few times a week and will share the recipe for it early next week. To bake rye bread, you need rye sourdough starter. You can buy it inexpensively on Cultures for Health website: they have a few different choices.

If you want to work, there are many ways to make this starter yourself. I always prefer the easiest way when it comes to cooking and baking, so my starter will take ten minutes of your time, stretched over three days.

Keep in mind that temperature is important. The warmer it is in your house, the faster the starter will work. Do not put you starter in a cold place and do not close it with a lid: it may cause the beneficial bacteria to die. I close my rye started with a towel, so that it can “breathe.”

Once your starter is ready, you have to “feed” it more rye flour and water about once a week. Here’s how this works:

When you are ready to bake some bread, add 2 cups of rye flour and 2 cups of warm water to your finished starter. Mix well. Take out 1/2 cup of this mixture: this is your new starter and you can refrigerate it. The rest is the base for your bread dough.

Rye Sourdough Starter

By Dr. Anastasia Published: February 9, 2013

    With the recent gluten-free craze, are we forgetting about the health benefits of rye? Rye supplies high levels of iron, calcium, …

    Ingredients

      Instructions

      1. Day 1: In a glass bowl, combine 1 cup of rye flour with 1 cup of warm water. Mix well, cover with a towel and leave in a dark place.
      2. Day 2: Take the starter base you made on Day 1 and add to it 1 cup of rye flour and 1 cup of warm water. Mix well, cover with a towel and leave in a dark place.
      3. Day 3: Take the starter base you made on Day 2 and add to it 2 cups of rye flour and 2 cups of warm water. Mix well, cover with a towel and leave in a dark place for 24 hours, after which your rye starter is ready. Use it for baking immediately, or refrigerate it for up to 8 days. Make sure to cover only with cloth while refrigerating.

      About Dr. Anastasia

      Dr. Anastasia Halldin holds a Ph.D in holistic nutrition. She is a homeschooling mother of four boys and a girl. Dr. Anastasia starred on a yoga TV show. She also produced and appeared in thirteen yoga DVDs. Dr. Anastasia speaks four languages and loves doing crafts with her children. She adores sharing her easy healthy family recipes with other mothers.
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      2 Responses to Rye Starter

      1. Maryanne says:

        Thanks for posting — have been thinking about trying a rye starter and this motivated me to do it!

      2. Pingback: Easy Homemade Rye Bread | HealthyMamaInfo

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